HIV, the power of fear

What are the chances of getting HIV? Take a guess. What if you use a needle of an HIV patient? What is the risk when having unprotected sex with an HIV infected person? The answer will follow, but I am 99,7% to 99,9% certain your percentages were too high.

What people used to fear

In the 80’s and 90’s people feared HIV. You get a megaload of viruses in your blood at once and your immune system gets severely beaten up. In the next 5-7 years of your life one by one your immune cells get killed by the virus, making it impossible to fight any infections. You get a pneumonia from a fungus that you normally don’t even notice. You die from the “simple” infections that seize any opportunity to make you sick (opportunistic infections). And you would die, weaker than an Autumn tree leaf.

Rules in how to get infected 

There are some “easy” ways to make sure you get HIV is you really want to (why would somebody try to get infected you ask now, just keep reading).
HIV is transmitted by blood and sex. The hospitals and blood transfusion banks test any donated blood for HIV (amongst other infections) so a blood transfusion won’t get you infected. When you are a big fan of injecting drugs don’t use clean sterile needles, same for tattoos. If you have sex with somebody you don’t know the HIV status of, never use a condom. If you do all this, you have a certain risk. Yay! Just kissing somebody won’t get you HIV and neither will hugging, touching or sitting on their toilet seat.

You might think I am crazy. Please understand, some people are really not afraid anymore. They no longer fear it. In some scenes it’s even a matter of “waiting until I get the infection” and they go have sex with HIV positive people to “just get it over with”.

Why people still get infected

Don’t they have self-control? Why is it so difficult to follow the “easy rules” not to get it? (read the previous part and add “not” in every sentence)
There are multiple possible answers to that.

First of all, people are not saints. Even the girls of All Saints asked for Booty Calls, and we all know what that stands for. You didn’t follow the rules all the time. For not following some easy rules, let’s call them mistakes, in life, well, be grateful you didn’t end up getting a horrible disease.

Secondly, using a condom is a bit of a nuisance. You’re in the middle of “something” and then you have to stop, find the condom, free the condom, lock the condom and then probably start the “something” all over again and finish the messing around until there is some unloading in the condom. Not really romantic, so yes, I understand that people in the heat of the moment skip that step.

But the actual answer why people still get infected is not about having self-control or if it is too difficult. It is about having a lack of fear. If smoking one cigarette today would lead to certain death tomorrow, people wouldn’t smoke. If having unprotected sex today would kill you within a week, well, I tink you’d do your utmost to find those condoms.

Low risk, not lethal

What are the chances of getting HIV? The actual risk to infection, and mind you these are rough numbers and very much influenced by the amount of virus in the blood, is actually not so high. If you use the needle from an HIV positive person (not on medication), your risk is approximately 0.3%. I know, you thought it was higher. If you have sex with an HIV positive person (with no medication), that chance is even lower. Depending if the woman or the man is infected it’s around 0.1%. Yes, it’s possible to get infected if you just have sex one time, but you are a very unlucky person. And of course the risks increase if you have sex with more people and especially with anal sex or other ways that give minor (or even major, still not judging) tears in anus or anywhere else getting blood involved.

What is really happening: unprotected sex, low chance of getting HIV, and if getting HIV, you don’t die tomorrow, you probably won’t even die within seven years, in fact: you might just die of old age. Almost overnight, HIV went from this terrible lethal disease to a chronic disease that’s easier treated than some types of diabetes. Some diabetes patients need three tablets three times a day. HIV patients take one tablet, once a day for the rest of their lives, with hardly any side effects.

Why use a condom? There is nothing to Fear.

Second wave of HIV infections?

This change in prognosis for the HIV infected patients was, and still is, great news. The number of newly infected patients with HIV is still declining. Also, great news. However, I predict a downfall, or upfall.

In the beginning of HIV, people were scared. They knew that they would die a horrible disease if they didn’t take care of themselves. They started to use more condoms. The rate of HIV infections went down, as well as for the other STD’s.

These days people are not fearing HIV. They’re less likely to use condoms, increasing their risk to all STD’s. We are already witnessing increases in STD’s like Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. These STD’s are easier to transmit then HIV. That might explain why we don’t see an increase in HIV infections, … yet.
I’m afraid we will be seeing a second spike in HIV infections in the near future. And then we’ll be living in a world with more complicated infections and an ongoing war against bacterial resistance.

It’s ok to be a little bit afraid sometimes. It might save your life.

Next time: the near future of HIV…

 

 

Image: http://www.dailytrust.com

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